Our History

This page features a chronology of significant events in our history. The Center for Evidence-Based Practices has its roots in over 35 years of research, education, and training (workforce development) initiatives of the Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel School of Applied Social Science at Case Western Reserve University and at the Department of Psychiatry at the School of Medicine of Case Western Reserve, with leadership from the following:

  • Lenore A. Kola, PhD, Mandel School
  • David E. Biegel, PhD, Mandel School
  • Robert J. Ronis, MD, MPH, Department of Psychiatry

DECEMBER 1999

The Center for Evidence-Based Practices began as the Ohio Substance Abuse and Mental Illness Coordinating Center of Excellence (Ohio SAMI CCOE) in December 1999 with a grant from the Ohio Department of Mental Health (ODMH), which received funding from the Community Mental Health Services Block Grant Program of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). The Ohio SAMI CCOE is one of several CCOE initiatives in the State of Ohio funded by ODMH. The SAMI CCOE was created to disseminate (provide technical assistance for) the evidence-based Integrated Dual Disorder Treatment (IDDT) model to service systems, organizations, and providers. The CCOE began serving nine community-based organizations.

IDDT is a model developed and studied by the Dartmouth Psychiatric Research Center (PRC). It improves quality of life and other outcomes for people diagnosed with co-occurring severe mental illness and substance use disorders.


APRIL 2002

The Ohio SAMI CCOE began to provide technical assistance for IDDT to four additional community-based organizations as part of the Implementing Evidence-Based Practices Project—a national dissemination effort funded by SAMHSA and coordinated by the Dartmouth PRC.

JANUARY 2003

The Ohio SAMI CCOE began to receive funding from the Ohio Department of Alcohol and Drug Addiction Services (ODADAS), expanding the public-academic partnership between Case Western Reserve University and ODMH that began in December 2000 with the creation of the SAMI CCOE.


JANUARY 2004

ODMH was awarded additional funding from SAMHSA's Community Mental Health Services Block Grant Program to implement Supported Employment (SE), the evidence-based practice, in four community-based organizations in Ohio. ODMH awarded funding to the Ohio SAMI CCOE to provide technical assistance to these organizations.


JULY 2005

The SAMI CCOE reorganized and created an additional CCOE—the Ohio Supported Employment (SE) Coordinating Center of Excellence—to provide technical assistance for the implementation of the evidence-based SE model. It also created the Center for Evidence-Based Practices at Case Western Reserve University, an umbrella organization to oversee the activities of both the SAMI and SE CCOEs.

ODMH was awarded funding from the Johnson & Johnson-Dartmouth Community Mental Health Program—a national dissemination effort coordinated by the Dartmouth PRC—to support the implementation of SE in three additional community-based organizations. ODMH awarded funding to the Center for Evidence-Based Practices to provide technical assistance to these organizations through the Center's Ohio SE CCOE initiative, bringing the total number of Ohio organizations implementing SE to 13.


SEPTEMBER 2005

The Ohio SE CCOE began providing technical assistance to six additional community-based organizations with additional funding that ODMH received from SAMHSA.


JANUARY 2007

The Center for EBPs was featured in the Winter 2007 issue of "MSASS Action," the newsletter for alumni, friends, and community partners of the Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences at Case Western Reserve University.


APRIL 2007

ODMH and ODADAS received funding from the Ohio Tobacco Prevention Foundation to develop a tobacco-cessation service model specifically for people with severe mental illness and/or substance use disorders and invited the Center for EBPs to collaborate in the planning and development process.


JUNE 2007

ODMH and ODADAS awarded funding to the Center for EBPs to design, implement, and evaluate a tobacco-cessation model through its Ohio SAMI CCOE initiative. The Center's model-development team began a planning process with representatives from partnering organizations and other Ohio stakeholders. The team also received consultation from Carlo DiClemente, Ph.D., of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County and Jill Williams, M.D., of the UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. Both Drs. DiClemente and Williams are nationally recognized for their research and program development for tobacco cessation.


DECEMBER 2007

The Tobacco Cessation Kick-Off Event was held in Columbus to introduce community-based and hospital-based behavioral healthcare organizations to the new "Tobacco and Recovery" service model designed by the Center for EBPs. The Center began providing technical assistance to community-based organizations and state psychiatric hospitals implementing the new model.


SEPTEMBER 2008

The Center began providing technical assistance for Motivational Interviewing (MI), an evidence-based treatment that is one of the best available to address ambivalence to change. MI is a therapeutic technique designed to help people resolve their ambivalence about making meaningful personal changes in their lives. MI also helps people identify their readiness, willingness, and ability to make the change. MI is a core component of evidence-based practices such as IDDT and SE, as well as other service models.

Several consultants and trainers at the Center were trained at and began participating in the international Motivational Interviewing Network of Trainers (MINT), an initiative which is directed by MI co-creators William R. Miller, Ph.D., and Stephen Rollnick, Ph.D.


NOVEMBER 2008

The November/December 2008 cover story of the nationally distributed Social Work Today magazine featured the Center's Ohio SAMI CCOE initiative. The story written by David Surface highlighted the work of a SAMI CCOE consultant and trainer and explored the evolution, effectiveness, and growing national commitment to IDDT. The story also featured the policy innovations of ODMH and ODADAS, as well as the work of colleagues in New Hampshire, Massachusetts, and Minnesota.


JANUARY 2009

The CBS Evening News with Katie Couric aired a report on Supported Employment (SE), the evidence-based practice, in Ohio. It featured a story of a consultant and trainer from the Center's Ohio SE CCOE initiative and a story of a consumer who returned to competitive and meaningful work at an auto dealership in Canton with help from Coleman Professional Services. At the time the CBS story aired, Coleman was one of 15 organizations implementing the SE model in Ohio with technical assistance from the Center for EBPs.


MARCH 2009

The Center began providing technical assistance for Benefits Planning (BP) to help direct-service providers help consumers make more informed decisions about their benefits, especially when they are pursuing part-time or full-time employment. Benefits Planning is a core component of the evidence-based SE model. The Center emphasizes that case managers, employment specialists, and other service providers do not need to be full-time benefits counselors or experts in benefits planning but may complement the work of benefits experts with some basic knowledge of Medicaid, housing subsidies, Supplemental Security Income (SSI), and Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI).


JULY 2009

The Tobacco and Recovery model was renamed "Tobacco: Recovery Across the Continuum" (TRAC), a stage-based motivational model for people with severe mental illness and/or substance use disorders. The new name emphasizes the model's intention to equip service providers with strategies to connect with people in all "stages of change," including people who are either unaware of or ambivalent about the benefits of reducing and eliminating tobacco use as well as those ready to reduce and become tobacco-free. TRAC integrates tobacco treatment with existing behavioral and primary healthcare approaches.


DECEMBER 2009

The Center for Evidence-Based Practices (through its Ohio SAMI CCOE initiative) expanded its technical-assistance strategies that help organizations plan and implement services for people diagnosed with co-occurring mental and substance use disorders. The Center began to utilize two organizational assessment and planning tools:

  • Dual Diagnosis Capability in Addiction Treatment (DDCAT) Index
  • Dual Diagnosis Capability in Mental-Health Treatment (DDCMHT) Index

Consultants and trainers use the DDCAT and DDCMHT to help service organizations assess their capability (or capacity) to provide treatment for co-occurring disorders and to develop and implement a plan to do so with increasing capacity over time.


OCTOBER 2010

The Center celebrated ten years of EBP implementation in the State of Ohio at its conference, titled "Sustaining Evidence-Based Practices: The Next 10 Years," which was held at the Greater Columbus Convention Center in Columbus, Ohio. Over 330 people from Ohio and 17 other states attended.


AUGUST 2013

The Ohio Department of Alcohol and Drug Addiction Services (OhioMHAS) awarded the Center a grant to establish a Coordinating Center of Excellence (CCOE) to disseminate Assertive Community Treatment (ACT), the evidence-based practice. ACT improves outcomes for people with severe mental illness who are most vulnerable to homelessness and hospitalization.

The Center's new Ohio ACT CCOE has it roots in a technical-assistance center that was supported by The Health Foundation of Greater Cincinnati for many years.


CURRENT ACTIVITIES

Consult these sections of our web site: